"Always make a total effort, even when the odds are against you." - Arnold Palmer

Sunday, 29 April 2012

Announcement: Alf Newman Memorial Quickplay Chess Tournament - Louth



ALF NEWMAN MEMORIAL QUICKPLAY CHESS TOURNAMENT

SATURDAY 26th MAY 2012

Louth Chess Club
St James’ Church House
6 Upgate
Louth
LN11 9ET

SCHEDULE

Doors Open                              9.30
Round 1                                    10.00-10.50
Round 2                                    11.00-11.50
Round 3                                    12.00-12.50
Lunch Break                              13.00-14.00
Round 4                                    14.00-14.50
Round 5                                    15.00-15.50
Round 6                                    16.00-16.50
Prize giving                               17.00

Entry fees are £8 per adult and £4 per child (a child is counted as being under 16 on 1/9/11). All entry fees will be returned as prizes. Please note there will be a penalty fee of £2 for entries postmarked after 21st May. Early entry to the tournament is advised as the venue has limited capacity. It may not be possible to accept entries on the day.

Please send entries to John Grasham, 2 Kidgate Court, Louth, LN11 9BF. All cheques should be made payable to LOUTH CHESS CLUB. For more information or extra entry forms please contact John Grasham on 07707624975 or jcgrasham@hotmail.co.uk

Please give the age of any players under 16 at the start of the current school year and the grading of any graded players. Please include your postal address, although entries will only be acknowledged if either an email address or a stamped, addressed envelope is enclosed.

Each player will have 25 minutes on the clock to complete all moves, i.e. a game lasts a maximum of 50 minutes.

The prizes are the Alf Newman memorial shield and at least £50 for the winner. There are also cash prizes for second place, third place and two grading prizes dependant on entrants grading. In the event of a tie cash prizes will be shared. Also the Nottingham Building Society Shield will be awarded to the highest ranked player affiliated to Louth who has not won it before. Cash prizes are dependent on the number of entries received.

Coffee, tea, squash & biscuits will be available free of charge. No other food will be provided. Parking is not permitted directly outside the venue but there are plenty of car parks and side streets around the town.

Please note: In all matters concerning the tournament, the decision of the controller shall be final and binding on all players. The congress committee reserves the right to refuse any entry, although such applicants will be notified.

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ALF NEWMAN MEMORIAL QUICKPLAY CHESS TOURNAMENT ENTRY FORM
Name(s)                                                 Grade (if any)   Club (if any)                             Age (if under 16 on 1/9/10)



I enclose a cheque for £           made payable to Louth Chess Club
Contact name, email address (please write clearly) and phone number:

Announcement: Lincolnshire Chess Association, George Renison Jamboree, Saturday 16th June 2012


Venue: St. James School, Grimsby (Markham Hall)

Clock start: 1pm 
Please register before 12:45

Format: 4 board team competition, 4 rounds; 25 minutes Rapid Play. 

Round 1- 1pm
Round 2- 2pm
Lunch: 30 minute break
Round 3- 3:30
Round 4- 4:30
Presentation 5:30

Please confirm team entry with Paul Chaplin 
Tel: 01472 825480 
Mobile: 07776262981 
Mailto: paul.chaplin@btinternet.com 

Kramnik-Aronian, Game #6: 3 - 3

Well it was big surprise for me yesterday when I switched on my computer a went to watch the live on-line transmission from Z├╝rich and when I saw first few moves I felt I was getting bored. 
Well opening choice did not look exciting, however, then both players made wonders. 
And everybody who was present or watching on-line had to be excited. Either Viktor Korchnoi who was present in the playing hall, or both commentators - GM Yannick Pelletier and IM Werner Hug who with the aid of Houdini tried to find out the best ways how to play the game.
The true is that in on moment - it was position after White move 33, Kramnik could improve his position and gain the edge. Would it be enough to win? Who knows, but what position one should play for win if not position with pawn up. 
Alas, Kramnik opted for another move, more "human-like" and the game ended up draw.

Kramnik-Aronian, Game #5: 2½ - 2½

Kramnik-Aronian, Game #4: 2 - 2

How to recover from defeat? Task for Levon Aronian. Let's have a look how he did it...

Kramnik-Aronian, Game #3: 1½ - 1½

Game #3 has been already published in one of mine previous posts, but I think that it deserves to be published in "re-play" mode and because of the annotations of GM Yannick Pelletier are interesting but the size of file extended the capacity of "generator" I publish both the game in "re-play" mode and annotations separately. 


Game #3





Swiss GM Yannick Pelletier
To lose the first game of the match as white came as a big blow for Kramnik. But in his second white game, he showed how great a champion he can be! After a rather unsuccessful start in the match, Kramnik needs to gain back some confidence. We, therefore, expect a solid game from him as black. 
1.e4 
In the first two games, Aronian managed to surprise his opponent. But this time, Kramnik did not give him the slightest opportunity to do so! He opens with the king's pawn, something he had not done in a classical game since 2006. 'First move, first surprise! We find it hard to recall when Aronian played 1. e4 for the last time in a classical game.' 'First move, first surprise! We find it hard to recall when Aronian played 1.e4 for the last time in a classical game.' 'First move, first surprise! We find it hard to recall when Aronian played 1.e4 for the last time in a classical game.' 'First move, first surprise! We find it hard to recall when Aronian played 1.e4 for the last time in a classical game.' 
1...e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nc3 
[3.Bb5 Nf6 
Even though Kramnik had not really prepared anything concrete, he had decided before the match to react to an unlikely 1.e4 with the Berlin Defence. Taking into account that both players are two of the greatest specialists in this system, we can expect an interesting battle.
4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Nc3 Be6
This is clearly a secondary move, which Kramnik tries for the first time.
10.Rd1+ Ke8 11.Ng5 Bc8
Going back like this may look like a beginner's move. But black understands that the white knight is not ideally placed, as it just left its best square f3.
12.h3 Be7 13.Bf4 
(13.Nf3 could have been considered, but Aronian does not feel like retreating without being forced to. His move is a novelty.) 
13...Nh4! 
(An excellent reaction. This move is not obvious, but Kramnik has a great feeling in these positions. Exchanging on g5 was not advisable because white gets the initiative after 13...Bxg5 14.Bxg5 Be6 15.g4; In case of the obvious 13...h6 , white goes back to f3 and is ready to play 15.g4 and swap knights on h4. As this exchange operation would be in his favour, the sense behind Kramnik's move becomes clear.
14.e6
Aronian felt that he could even get a slightly unpleasant position without this concrete measure. Indeed, black is now ready to play h6 followed by Be6 and Ng6.
14...f6 
(Even though this reaction seems to lead to comfortable equality, Kramnik thought for a long time before playing it. Another continuation appealed to him as well: 14...fxe6 15.Nge4 e5! 16.Bxe5 Bxh3 Here, white should probably follow with 17.Bg3 , as 17.Bxg7 Rg8 18.gxh3 Rxg7+ is obviously alright for black. But even though white will be able take on c7 after 17.Bg3, the balance should not be disrupted.While Kramnik pondered over his move, the commentators got carried away by the computer suggestion 14...Ng6?! Both players did not consider this artificial move seriously, as white can simply take on f7 with the pawn and ensure himself of an edge. But in fact, after a while, the computer refutes its own idea by playing 15.Nxf7 Nxf4 16.Nxh8 It turns out that after16...Bxe6 17.Rd4, black's pieces are exposed to white's firing rooks on central files. Thus, it will not be easy to capture the lonely Nh8.) 
15.Nf7 Rg8 16.Bxc7 Bxe6 17.Nd6+ Bxd6 18.Bxd6 Kf7 19.f3
Everyone expected a draw soon and an additional rapid game. Including Kramnik, who played his next move quickly and offered a draw.
19...Nf5 
(In the press conference, however, the Russian criticized his move and admitted he had played carelessly. Objectively, though, black is still alright after that, even though his practical task is made a bit more difficult. According to Kramnik, 19...Rgd8 20.Bc5 Bf5 was more accurate. But it is possible that Aronian would still have turned down the draw in this case and played on with 21.Rac1) 
20.Bc5 b6 21.Bf2 Rgd8 22.a4!
Aronian shows that his wish to continue the fight was not only of psychological nature. The black queenside is put under pressure.
22...Ne7 
(22...Nd6?! followed by Nb7 would be a strong defensive manoeuvre, but black does not have the time to set it up because of 23.a5) 
23.a5 c5 24.Nb5 
a) After this or 24.Ne4 , black manages to equalize thanks to 24...Nc6; 
b) During the live commentaries, we tried to make the slightly unnatural 24.g4 work. Indeed,  black cannot yet improve the position of his knight, as 24...Nc6?! (24...Nd5? 25.axb6) 25.axb6 axb6 26.Rxa8 Rxa8 27.Rd6 is unpleasant. For instance 27...Rc8 28.Na4 Ke7 29.Rd1 and 29...Rb8 fails to 30.Nxb6! Yet, 24.g4 does not contain any threat, and might even cause some weakening of white's kingside. Therefore, we do not think that black should really be in danger here;
24...Nc6! 25.Rxd8 Rxd8 26.axb6 
(26.Nxa7 was tempting, but after 26...Nxa7 27.axb6 Nc6 28.Bxc5 Bc8 black controls the light squares and keeps the balance.
26...axb6 27.Ra6 Rd1+
Black obviously refuses to defend passively. The rook penetrates into the white camp in order to create threats.
28.Kh2 Rd2 29.Rxb6 
(29.Bxc5! could even lead to difficulties because of 29...Bd5 The bishop simultaneously attacks f3 and protects the Nc6, so that black now threatens to take the bishop.) 
29...Rxc2 
(The right move order! Black loses after 29...Rxf2? 30.Rxc6 Rxc2 31.Rc7+! Kg6 32.Nd4!) 
30.Nd6+ 
Aronian could have simplified immediately, but he keeps on trying to squeeze the maximum from his position.
30...Ke7 31.Ne4 Nd4!
But Kramnik finds the best defence.
32.Rb7+ Kf8 33.Rc7 Rxb2 34.Rxc5 Nf5 35.Ng3 Rxf2 36.Nxf5 Bxf5 37.Rxf5 Ra2
This draw may have looked insipid at first sight, but it contained some hidden ideas. Aronian managed to put his opponent under some pressure, thus showing that he keeps on dictating the pace in the match. But Kramnik can certainly be satisfied, as he proved that the first game was only an accident. He will be white in the third game, so that the ball is in his camp! 1/2-1/2 Aronian,L (2820)-Kramnik,V (2801)/Zurich 2012 'This draw may have looked insipid at first sight, but it contained some hidden ideas. Aronian managed to put his opponent under some pressure, thus showing that he keeps on dictating the pace in the match. But Kramnik can certainly be satisfied, as he proved that the first game was only an accident. He will be white in the third game, so that the ball is in his camp!' 'This draw may have looked insipid at first sight, but it contained some hidden ideas. Aronian managed to put his opponent under some pressure, thus showing that he keeps on dictating the pace in the match. But Kramnik can certainly be satisfied, as he proved that the first game was only an accident. He will be white in the third game, so that the ball is in his camp!' 'This draw may have looked insipid at first sight, but it contained some hidden ideas. Aronian managed to put his opponent under some pressure, thus showing that he keeps on dictating the pace in the match. But Kramnik can certainly be satisfied, as he proved that the first game was only an accident. He will be white in the third game, so that the ball is in his camp!' 'This draw may have looked insipid at first sight, but it contained some hidden ideas. Aronian managed to put his opponent under some pressure, thus showing that he keeps on dictating the pace in the match. But Kramnik can certainly be satisfied, as he proved that the first game was only an accident. He will be white in the third game, so that the ball is in his camp!'] 
3...Nf6 4.d4 
Again! The Four-Knights could not really be expected by Aronian... 
4...exd4 5.Nxd4 Bc5 
... who therefore deviates from the main path (5...Bb4). 
6.Be3 Bb6 7.Qd2 0-0 8.0-0-0 Re8 9.f3 d5 
[A very natural reaction. 9...d6 would simply allow white to develop an attack on the kingside thanks to his space advantage.]
10.exd5 Nxd5 11.Bg5 
This is about where Kramnik's preparation ended. He quickly checked this position with his computer and noticed that white was ok. Therefore, Aronian's decision to sacrifice the queen did not scare him. 
11...Nxc3!? 
[It certainly looks dangerous to weaken the king's diagonal with 11...f6 , while; 11...Nde7 fails to impress too. Aronian did not hesitate long. He thought that the queen sacrifice was entirely correct.] 
12.Bxd8 Nxd1 13.Bxc7!? 
[Kramnik took a long time for this move, as he needed to work out the following complications precisely. The computer prefers 13.Bh4 Nxd4 14.Qxd1 Nf5 15.Bg5 , but both players agreed afterwards that black was close to equality in this case.] 
13...Bxc7 14.Nxc6 Ne3 15.Bb5! 
[Kramnik finds the best continuation! 15.Nd4? would be bad because of 15...Bf4 , with the cute idea 16.Bb5 Nf1! 17.Rxf1 (17.Qxf4? Re1#) 17...Bxd2+ 18.Kxd2 Rd8 , when black obviously has better chances.] 
15...bxc6 
[Aronian thought for quite a long time here. He quite liked 15...a6 16.Ba4 Nc4 , but white seems to be better after 17.Qb4 b5 18.Bb3 Bf4+ 19.Kb1 He eventually chose the game continuation, assessing it as at least equal for him. As we shall see, this is overoptimistic. Let us note that 15...Bf4? fails to 16.Ne7+! , when black succumbs to the weakness of his back rank.; A worthy alternative, however, was offered by the difficult move 15...Bf5 After 16.Nd4 Bf4 17.Bxe8 Nxg2 , white gives back the queen but remains a pawn up: 18.Bxf7+ Kxf7 19.Qxf4 Nxf4 20.Nxf5 White's technical task is far from obvious, although one would not like to defend the blakc position against someone like Kramnik.] 
16.Bxc6 Nc4 17.Qd4?! 
[A slight inaccuracy, which Kramnik explained by having overlooked black's 18th move. 17.Qb4 was clearly superior, with the possible continuation 17...Be6 18.Bxe8 Rxe8 19.Re1 Black finds it hard to increase his activity because of tactical weaknesses such as his back rank.] 
17...Be6 18.Bxa8 Bb6! 19.Qd3 
[19.Qe4 only leads to a draw after 19...Be3+ 20.Kd1 Nxb2+ 21.Ke2 Bb6 , because white's king is too exposed. The computer proposed other moves, but Kramnik's choice to keep his queen centralized appears more natural.] 
19...Rxa8 
[From a pure practical point of view, 19...Rd8 should not worry white, who can simplify into a slightly better endgame with 20.Qxd8+ Bxd8 21.g3 Contrary to the game continuation, only two results are possible here.] 
20.Re1 Rd8 21.Qe4 g5?! 
[Aronian still liked his position, as he admitted in the press conference. But the problem for black is that all his pieces already display maximal activity, which makes it hard to find a plan. White, however, can systematically improve his position by playing c3 and b3. The text move rather weakens the black king, which is why 21...g6 or; 21...h5 should have been preferred. But it is still unclear how to face 22.c3 followed by 23.b3] 
22.c3 Bc5 23.Re2 h6 24.g3 
[Here or at the previous move, white could have played the obvious 24.h4 . But Kramnik prefers strengthening his position with solid moves.] 
24...a5 25.f4 a4 26.f5! 
Exchanging on g5 was also good, but this move leads to concrete very play. 
26...Bd5 27.Qd3 Bb6 28.b3!? axb3 29.axb3 Na5 30.Re8+!? 
[30.Qb5 is recommended by the computer, but is 30...Nxb3+ 31.Kc2 Nd4+! 32.cxd4 Bxd4 really winning? Kramnik does not wish to answer this question over the board, and finds an interesting alternative.] 
30...Rxe8 31.Qxd5 Rd8 32.Qb5 Rd6 33.Kc2 Kg7?! 
[Aronian found himself in acute time-trouble. 33...Bd8 was more stubborn, although the white pawns should decide the game after 34.Qe8+ Kg7 35.Qe5+ Rf6 36.b4 Nc6 37.Qe4] 
34.b4 Nb7 35.c4 Rf6 36.g4 
[36.c5 was obviously good enough] 
36...Nd8 37.c5 Bc7 38.Qd7 Nc6 39.b5 Na7 40.Qxc7 Nxb5 41.Qe5 
Thanks to the eternal pin on the rook, white will easily break the blockade of his passed pawn. 
41...Na7 42.Kd3         1-0

A fascinating game, where Kramnik showed strong nerves in order to convert the domination of his queen over black's three pieces. 

Kramnik-Aronian, Game #2: ½ - 1½

Kramnik-Aronian, Game #1: 0 - 1

Last game played yesterday completed the match Kramnik-Aronian and some of you perhaps watched this even on-line (http://www.livestream.com/kramnikaronian).
For those who missed it I took the liberty to post here the games available from http://www.kramnikaronian.com/ annotated by GM Yannick Pelletier.


Game #1

Saturday, 28 April 2012

How Not To Win The Won Ending ...

How not to win the won ending? Today I want to present one of my recent games which is very good example of above mentioned problem.
White gains strategically won position, alas, he doesn't find the way how to turn advantage into the victory.
Hope you will enjoy...


The game was influenced by time trouble and both players continued fighting after move 67...Nxc7, however, the score-sheet was not kept by anyone. White extended himself hoping for victory on time, Black queened the e-pawn, however, running out of time he just grabbed all White's pawns and having left 4 seconds to go he claimed draw.
That night I was scarred a bit because I thought that an apparition of GM Yuri Averbakh would come to haunt me ... and deservedly.

Thursday, 26 April 2012

Grantham-1: Nottinghamshire League Champion

In the last round of Nottinghamshire League, Division 1, Grantham-1 just confirmed its Champion title in the match with Ashfield-1 when won 3:2.

Ashfield-1
2:3
Grantham-1
Burke S
174
1:0
Birtwistle N
182
Halfpenny G
186
½:½
Mangione C
193
Toothill A
174
0:1
Cumbers P
197
Morgan PD
140
0:1
Payne N
183
Graham N
147
½:½
David I
172


Grantham-1 defended this title third time in the row which is definitely remarkable achievement.
Team Captain, Nigel Birtwistle, as well as Club Chairman, Fred Jones, can be happy and contended.



Team
P
W
D
L
F
A
Df
Pn
Pts
1
Grantham-1
14
11
1
2
47
23
24
0
23
2
Gambit-1
13
9
0
4
38.5
26.5
12
0
18
3
West Brigdford-1
13
7
4
2
38.5
26.5
12
0
18
4
Ashfield-1
13
6
1
6
33.5
31.5
2
0
13
5
Mansfield-1
13
5
3
5
33.5
31.5
2
0
13
6
West Notting'm-1
13
3
4
6
30.5
34.5
-4
0
10
7
University-1
12
3
0
9
20.5
39.5
-19
0
6
8
Ashfield-2
13
1
1
11
18
43
-29
0
3